Bath, United Kingdom

Jeanette Kakareka



So, this was a while ago now but I wanted to blog about it anyway because it's a fond memory and I recommend making the trip if you ever can. During the long Easter weekend, my boyfriend and I stayed two nights in Bath.

We booked a hotel right by the train station which was super comfy and easy. We checked in about as early as possible then headed for a walk around, stopping into some antique stores and saw the Pulteney Bridge, the Royal Crescent, and the Assembly Rooms.
 

 Outside of Train Station

Outside of Train Station

I was especially excited about the Assembly Rooms because I could imagine all of the Georgian parties and gatherings. It was also free.

 Jin inside of the Assembly rooms

Jin inside of the Assembly rooms

  Polaroids on the Bridge and around the Crescent.

Polaroids on the Bridge and around the Crescent.

I had heard recommendations to check out Sally Lunn's, which not only had great food and teas, but is also one of the oldest standing buildings in Bath.

  I ordered a mushroom traditional trencher dish, and he ordered a steak with some sort of apple sauce.

I ordered a mushroom traditional trencher dish, and he ordered a steak with some sort of apple sauce.

We then went back to relax at the hotel and that was the end of day one.

Day two began with getting our breakfast from the hotel and then heading to the famous Bath Abbey. A free thing to do, although they do suggest a small donation.

  The beautiful fan vaulting of the ceilings inside.

The beautiful fan vaulting of the ceilings inside.

The abbey was originally founded in the 7th century, but rebuilt in the 12th and 16th century. We both really enjoy going into churches for the architecture, and this was apparently a more unusual example of the Gothic style. The gravestones inside of the abbey floor and walls were really interesting to read and we enjoyed getting a close look at the stained glass. We definitely recommend taking a look inside and grabbing one of the free paper pamphlets, which can give you extra information on what you are seeing.

Next, we went to the Roman Baths, which is located right next to the abbey. It costed £15 per adult and everyone is given a free audio guide in a number of languages. There were many recovered artifacts from the Roman period of Bath's history, (when they called the town "aquae sulis"), including the Gorgon's head. The buildings that now surround them were built in the 18th century.

  A shot of one of the stunning Roman bath pools.

A shot of one of the stunning Roman bath pools.

  Inside the Pump Room, where you exit after the baths

Inside the Pump Room, where you exit after the baths

After lunch and coffee in a cafe, we went to see the Jane Austen Centre, which, as much as I love her work, I didn't love the museum equally. But Jin did enjoy writing with ink and it was nice being inside of the house that she lived in for five years. This was £11 per adult.

After we left, we took a long scenic walk around the town by all the shops and ended up by the river. Bath is a beautiful town to just walk around and enjoy the outside of its many historic buildings. We then got some dinner takeaway and hopped our train back to London.

We had a lovely weekend and definitely suggest it to anyone with the ability to take a small trip over.